ABOUT US

At Ohop Originals we think we’ve created a pretty special place to work and live and we’d like to share it with others through workshops, events, and products. Situated in the heart of Ohop Valley in Eatonville, Washington, we are part garden, part farm and part art and music studio. Our mission is to help others express their creativity while enjoying the beauty around them.

At Ohop Originals we strive to be as sustainable and organic as possible through the use of sustainable materials and the reuse of non-sustainable materials.

  • DIANE METTLER

    Diane has always loved flowers. Her first bouquet was plucked for her mom from woodland wild flowers on the family dairy farm. Not much has changed. Diane is still plucking flowers on the family farm, but now she grows her own amazing flowers for weddings and events . . . and her mom.

  • CHRIS BIVINS

    Chris is a professional artist, graphic designer, musician and backbone of the farm. If there is a greenhouse to go up, a tractor to be driven or compost to be moved, he’s there. But if you need anything from table-top signs to programs, or a one-of-a-kind vase to guitarist, he’s also your guy. 

  • OUR FERTILIZING CREW

    These four ladies are the “O” in organic. This happy fertilization crews helps ensure your flowers are bright, healthy and sustainably grown. You might also get them to pose for a picture when you pick up flowers.

1 of 3
  • Hellebores

    Hellebores are marvelous winter-flowering perennials with evergreen foliage. They are often called Winter Roses as they are a welcome boom in the winter.  They come in a variety of colors, soft pinks, white and burgundy. 

  • Daffodils

    Daffodils are a bright symbol of spring starting to pop. An interesting fact, they were brought to Britain by the Romans who believed daffodil sap would heal wounds. Unfortunately, the opposite is true.

  • Forsythia

    You can’t miss a forsythia bush in the spring. Masses of yellow flowers bloom up the branches in early spring and work well in arrangements. When it rains, their flowers tip downward to protect their pollen.

1 of 3